photography | carl johnson
the tant mieux project, ed. sadi ranson-polizzotti
Sunday
Jun152008

animal rights and spirituality by sherry ackerman

dressage.jpg 
 

The book you see above represents an incredible act of courage and vision. In 1997, when Dressage in the Fourth Dimension was originally published, bestsellers like Susan Chernak McElroy’s Animals as Teachers and Healers and Monty Roberts’s The Man Who Listens to Horses were a couple of years away from becoming bestsellers.

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Sunday
Jun152008

behind the myths by sherry ackerman

What’s the buzz? Tell me what’s happening!  It seems like there is a lot of talk right now about something called “the Carroll Myth”.  The Association for New Carroll Studies, for example, claims that the current image of Lewis Carroll was built on a handful of influential books that emerged in the century following his death. The Association is not so much saying that these biographies are inherently wrong as they are claiming that they are incomplete. They treat Carroll superficially, with almost exclusive emphasis on conventionality. It is as if Carroll is “Ozzie” in the old “Ozzie and Harriet” series, without any real attention to the more subtle nuances…the subjective elements…that made him whole. In a Heideggerian sense, there hasn’t been a sufficient search for the authentic Carroll.

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Friday
Jun132008

technorati

Sunday
May182008

love as nonsense | 42 seconds of cynicism by sadi ranson-polizzotti



In 1856, Lewis Carroll tipped his hand concerning his rather satirical views about love in a piece that appeared in the Train entitled “Novelty and Romancement”.

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Sunday
May182008

Alice's Adventures Underground on the Tungsten E

lc%20alice%20liddell%20seated.jpgI can understand what it is like to have fallen down the rabbit hole in a number of ways and can relate to our dear Alice as she makes her way through the myriad gardens in Alice's Adventures Underground (the original title of Alice in Wonderland). Who would have ever thought I'd be reading this of all books on a device no larger than the size of my palm (hence the name) on a Tungsten E series, the pages scrolling effortlessly before me as I sit bumping along on the subway, garnering strange looks from the curious, and reading the next book on my list.

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